Chasing Relevance

Chasing Relevance: 6 Steps to Understand, Engage And Maximize Next-Generation Leaders in the Workplace by Dan Negroni

There are more than 83 million millennials in the United States, representing 36% of our workforce. By 2025, that number will grow to 75%. If millennials are not your employees yet, they will be soon-as well as your biggest customers. Our ability to attract, train, manage and retain this next generation of leaders is critical to the future success of our businesses. But a huge and damaging connection, communication, and understanding gap exists between non-millennials and millennials in our workplaces. Why? Because millennials are not a problem that needs to be fixed, they are an opportunity that needs to be embraced. We must all find relevance in bridging the gap to create next-generation leaders in all of us by: – creating powerful, authentic relationships – promoting behavior that creates a culture of openness, delivering value and shared purpose – teaching real-deal skills and increasing individual accountability to drive sustained results

That’s what Chasing Relevance is about: being better leaders by guiding those millennials and letting them guide us, having everyone be their best self by caring enough to connect. The choice is clear: we need to care more about millennials by pushing ourselves to be better leaders, coaches, and mentors. Because we love them, we need them and we want them to succeed. It’s time to stop chasing relevance and make it happen.

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Perhaps because I’m a millennial, I don’t understand how anyone could manage their employees (let alone their millennials) in ways other than through the strategy outlined in Chasing Relevance. Yet they do because I’ve lived it, I’ve seen it, and I keep seeing it.

This was a truly fantastic read! 36% of the American workforce is millennials, yet people are still writing articles about how millennials are the worst generation (like this*). It’s a refreshing change of pace to read a book that talks not only about what’s great about millennials, but how to do better in the workplace whether you’re a manager of millennials or millennial employee.

Even if you somehow don’t have any millennial employees (and you haven’t been avoiding hiring them), you can use the tools and techniques in this book. Because the strategy in Chasing Relevance is really a better, more productive way to manage a business and be in a workplace. Period.

Chasing Relevance is divided into two parts. The first is about making over yourself to be a better employee or manager. The second is about the B.R.I.D.G.E. theory of getting over generational gaps to boost employee morale, retention, and productivity. It’s important to take the time to work through each section of the book. The first part is very interactive and requires you to do some external thinking beyond just processing what you’re reading. The second part is a 6-step process that you will probably need to tackle piecemeal, especially if the concepts are really foreign to how you manage and interact with others.

As a millennial, I will say this book is completely spot-on. The six steps of B.R.I.D.G.E. are how I manage and also how I like to be managed. I’m not saying I’m naturally perfect at this because I’m a millennial. I’m a human and I struggle to be better in certain areas – particularly with I, D, and G. But I firmly believe this is the best way to get the most out of people. All other methods are problematic pretenders that have no place in the modern workplace.

*Yes, I did deliberately choose an article from Breitbart

Click here to buy: Chasing Relevance: 6 Steps to Understand, Engage and Maximize Next Generation Leaders in the Workplace

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