Local San Diego

Local San Diego: Poetry International Publishing Fair

SDSU Publishing Fair presented by Poetry International 3/19/12

This is going to be a bit of a shorter post, just sort of a summary of thoughts presented by the panel. The panel was composed of five representatives, including members from Cooper Dillon Press, Calypso Editions, and City Works Press.

The fair was put on as a congregation of small, local presses. It was exciting to see different organizations run by undergraduates, graduate students, and people who love literature. One of the most interesting points of the panel was how quickly the talk devolved into discussions about markets and in particular, e-books. Among the most interesting thoughts (no accreditation because I’m not sure who was talking), was the idea that e-books don’t replace actual books. Most of the people buying e-books are readers already; thus, they buy real flesh and blood books because they love reading. In this light, e-books are more a convenient companion to the paper book.

Another interesting idea (again no accreditation) is that the e-books as we see them now are a very primitive form of what they’re going to be in the future. There’s a lot of cool things you can do with technology; people who work in digital poetics and media as visual artists and writers can attest to that. E-books as they are now are essentially fancier PDF files. But they have the potential to be completely interactive, with sound and voice components, differences in color, etc. One person even brought up how cool it would be if the text faded off an on the page or changed colors. Now that is an entirely different beast than we’re seeing now. The technology isn’t there at the moment to support that, but it will be. And when it does, in my opinion, e-books will be even less competition to regular books because they will have evolved into something completely different. It’s like the difference between theatre and film or film and photography- they have the same roots, but now they’ve gone their separate ways and become mediums all of their own accord. They’re each supplementary to the overall artistic experience that is part of culture and society as we know it.

Participants (in no particular order):

Alchemy: Journal of Translation

Red Hen Press

Fiction International

Poetry International

Calypso Editions

Cider Press Review

Brick Road Press

Cooper Dillon Press

City Works Press

Pacific Review

California Journal of Poetics

Writers Ink Literary Center

Acorn Review

Puma Press

Border Voices Poetry Project

San Diego JCC Literary Series

Museum of the Living Artist Literary Series

Denver Publishing Institute

San Diego Poetry Annual/ Garden Oak Press

Haiku San Diego & Haiku Society of America Anthology

Black Crow Reading Series

Personal, UCSD

Shoutout for UCSD

I’d like to take a moment to talk about a few student-run/affiliated publications that are near and dear to my heart.

The first is Mania Magazine, a student-run magazine of student art at UCSD. Not only have I been a sometime contributor over the years, but so have quite a few of my friends. It’s wonderful to have a place to foster new voices and new art. My very good friend, Steve, is editor at Mania right now (his personal blog is here ). Check out some of the previous issues of Mania, which are now online for your reading pleasure.

Scumble Literary Journal just went up recently (their very first issue is online!). Scumble has its roots with the thriving community that comes out to Blabbermouth Nites, now held monthly at the Loft. If you’re local, check out the Facebook page here for more information.

Finally, I work on Alchemy, a new journal of translation at UCSD. We’re busily working on getting our first issue online (though we don’t quite have the website together yet). We accept submissions through alchemythejournal@gmail.com. For now, our Facebook page is here .

Sorry for what amounted to a link dump. But I’m actually not sorry. Just giving love to a great community and to those who love me in return ❤