Fiction, Personal, Plays, Top Ten Tuesday, Writing

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Blog Posts That Give the Best Picture of You

This week’s TTT covers ten blog posts (on your blog!) that give the best picture of you as a reader and/or a person. As always, TTT is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish.

I feel a little awkward with this one, as I’m writing a big ‘ol braggo post (but that is kind of sort of what blogging is, yes?)

1. My Extended About Me. Kind of an obvious choice.

2. This is a super recent post, but I think this short story is really representative of my writing.

3. On the same note, I wrote a short play two years ago and performed it at an open mic with my friend. I don’t do vlogs or anything or the sort, so this is your one and only (for the moment) chance to see me live. Haha.

4. And again, a little bit of flash fiction I threw up on the blog.

5. Favorite Book: Shadow of the Wind

6. Favorite Book: Hyperion

7. Favorite Book: Plainsong

8. Favorite Book: The Fault in Our Stars

9. Favorite Book (This and the afore-mentioned only represent a small portion of the things I love dearly): The Lover’s Dictionary

10. Most amazing motivational speech ever, by Neil Gaiman.

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Literary Characters Who Remind Me of Me!

As always, TTT is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s challenge is 10 literary characters who remind you of yourself or someone else.This was actually a little bad hard.

1. Daenerys Targaryen (Game of Thrones Series)

2. Madeline (The Marriage Plot)

3. Aria Montgomery (Pretty Little Liars Series)

4. Hermione Granger (Harry Potter Series)

5. Hazel (The Fault in Our Stars)

6. Mia Thermopolis (Princess Diaries Series)

7. Daine (Immortals Series)

8. Sabriel (Abhorsen Series)

9. Tibby Rollins (Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants)

10. Amy Harper Bellafonte (The Passage)

Fiction, Reviews, Young Adult

The Fault in Our Stars

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

This isn’t the type of book I would have ordinarily picked up on my own. Kids + Cancer = Too sad for life. Generally, I don’t read books that make me unduly sad and/or cry. Life is sad enough without my favorite things making me sad, too. But this is one book I’m so glad I decided to embrace.

I’ve never read John Green before. I read a handful of pages of An Abundance of Katherines, but didn’t like it much so I stopped. I’m sensing that I’ll try and read that book again, soon. Maybe I was too young for John Green before. Or not ready. Or something.

I’ve just finished this book and I can’t quit crying. I’m not sure if I’m crying from sadness, from happiness, or from the beauty of the book itself. This is the pinnacle of what young adult literature should be. Beautiful, relatable, and moving. This is why I write- to teach kids that there are still things worth reading in the world and more of them are being written everyday.

Kudos to John Green for sneaking in poetry and philosophy into a young adult novel. But also for writing a book so perfect in every way. There are not enough stars for this book. Maybe all the stars in the sky would be enough. But maybe not.

There isn’t much else I can say without destroying the perfection of the novel, but there is this.

Hazel and Augustus are just two kids with cancer trying to make sense of a messy world. Theirs is a beautiful romance, made even more beautiful by the cancer cloud that hangs over them, threatening each and every moment of their bliss. But isn’t that what all our lives are? Beautiful moments tempered with the notion that it could all end at any moment, blown away like ash in the wind.

As Augustus says, “My thoughts are stars I can’t fathom into constellations”.