The Little Prince

By Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Moral allegory and spiritual autobiography, The Little Prince is the most translated book in the French language. With a timeless charm it tells the story of a little boy who leaves the safety of his own tiny planet to travel the universe, learning the vagaries of adult behaviour through a series of extraordinary encounters. His personal odyssey culminates in a voyage to Earth and further adventures.

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The first time I ever read this book, I was a teenager in French class and we read en Francais of course. I really liked this book at the time, though I’m not sure if the version I read was simplified in the French, because this book has quite a lot of complex ideas in it!

I didn’t remember the story super well other than the Little Prince saying, “Design-moi un mouton!”. That’s “draw me a sheep” in English and that interaction touches off the whole story between the narrator and the Little Prince.

This is a lovely little book that I wish I had discovered at a younger age, though I love re-reading it as an adult. It has lots of wonderful, deep ideas about life that are essential to learn and remember.

Of course, the most-quoted line in this book has to be, “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”

I’m also excited to see the movie that’s coming out. When I started watching the trailer, I thought it was an ad for another movie at first and then I realized it was all the same movie!

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Wish I’d Read as a Kid

This week’s TTT is a freebie, so I chose one theme from the archives. TTT is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

1. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery

-I read this for the first time in high school French class. I love it so much. I never even knew about it until that class, but I wish that I had.

2. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

-I read this for the first time in college. I wish I’d read it in middle or high school. This was the kind of book I needed to read then.

3. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

-Still never read this book, though it’s kind of a quintessential classic for children.

4. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

-I recently moved out of my apartment complex. At that complex, people had a habit of setting their unwanted things near the elevator on each floor. I recently found this book, along with a few others, and it made me think how I never read it as a kid.

5. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling

-Same as above.

6. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

-Same as above

7. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

-In late high school, I went on a quest to read all of C.S. Lewis’s books in this series. I think I maybe read four. I wish I’d read these when I was younger.

8. The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

-I wish I’d read all the books in this series. I’d seen the movie several times over, but never read the book or any of the others set in Oz.

9. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

-I wasn’t even familiar with this story until I watched the Johnny Depp film version.

10. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

-Still never read this.